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Patterns

Wizards

Sometimes, the eligibility for a VA benefit or resource is so complex that it has multiple access pathways, depending on a user's specific needs or circumstances. Users may experience consequences (e.g. not getting the benefit or limiting benefit options), if they misunderstand eligibility content or choose the wrong pathway. VA.gov uses a wizard pattern to guide users down an optimal pathway for their circumstances.

  • The VA.gov wizard pattern consists of a series of simple questions, written in plain language, used to glean a user’s specific eligibility status, background, or specific needs/goals.
  • Wizards serve up one question at a time.
  • Wizards use conditional logic, whereby the answer to the first question determines the next question to be asked, or answer options that should be made available.
  • Wizards do not submit or store data.

Examples of wizards on VA.gov

gif demonstrating a form wizard for VA Education

  • Education Wizard: Find your benefits education form. You may need to scroll down to find the wizard. This wizard is used to help guide users to the correct education benefits form.

  • VA Disability Claim: How to file a VA disability claim You may need to scroll down to find the wizard. This wizard is used to ensure that the right users are entering the disability claim application process at the right place. Some users, such as active duty service members, need to complete a different form on Benefits. Other users may need to complete an intent to file form before they can start the form on VA.gov. This wizard tries to divert users to the correct place.

  • Apply for service discharge upgrade: How to apply for a discharge upgrade. You may need to scroll down to find the wizard. Applying for a service discharge upgrade is a relatively new and very complex process. Depending on a user’s specific set of circumstances, they may need to complete different forms and send them to different places. This wizard is meant to collect information about those specific circumstances to give users the best available guidance of what they can do next. There are over 100 different combinations from the wizard that can yield different results, so it does not make sense to do a simple content page to explain eligibility.

    This tool was developed prior to Formation, so some of the patterns are not in alignment with other wizards. For example, the wizard starts at a new URL, does not use the blue sidebar, etc. However, this can be used as an example for similar use cases, where a very complex set of characteristics or circumstances may determine a user’s next step.

Where to place wizards

The wizard should live on the page on both the Eligibility and How to Apply pages for an application. The wizards begin under blue featured content eligibility boxes but before accordions or additional information.

Specifics of the pattern

  • Green “Start” Button: A wizard is launched through a primary button (green), with a clear label about what the wizard will help the user do, for example “Find your education benefits form”. A wizard may also END with a call-to-action, for example, “Apply now”; this button kicks off the next step, given the details that the user provided in the wizard. To distinguish between the call-to-action that starts the wizard and the call-to-action that takes the user to their next step and to set the hierarchy correctly when the sequence is complete, the first button changes from green to blue once clicked, and the final button becomes the green, primary call-to-action.

  • Questions: Questions appear one at a time under the button, using an expanding blue vertical left bar as new questions are added. Questions are conditional, based on previous answers. Structure the logic tree for wizard questions to get users to gather information from users in as few questions as possible, while still directing them to the best next step for their circumstances.

  • Warning alerts in the wizard. Show a warning alert if a user answers a question in a way that is uncommon, or if they need to first do some other process that cannot be accessed via the wizard. For example, in the Education Form wizard, Show the Warning Alert immediately after the question, and provide concrete next steps and directions.
    gif demonstrating a form wizard for VA Education featuring a users that answers a specific question that triggers a warning

  • Error alerts in the wizard. Show an error alert if a user answers a question in a way that would render them ineligible to complete any of the forms serviced by the wizard. Instead, they may need to stop what they are doing and follow a different process on a different page or website. For example, in the Disability Claim wizard (shown below), a user who is still active duty needs to complete a completely different form on EBenefits, and completing an application on VA.gov would be a waste of time. Show the Error Alert immediately after the question, and provide concrete next steps and directions.

    screenshot of wizard with an error

  • Editable answers: Users can scroll up to see all of their previous answers and make changes at any time. If a user makes a change to the answer to an earlier question, hide all previous answers and show only the next appropriate question in the series, based on the user’s answer.

Note: For both alert cases, a user can still change their answer in the wizard to access and complete the form. We do not block users from accessing a form completely based on their answers to the wizard questions because there is always an edge case. Theoretically, we want to make the BEST thing they can do the EASIEST thing to do, based on the information the user has provided. So, if we hypothesize that they are ineligible based on how they answered the wizard questions, we should be making the easiest next step to do the next best thing that they can do.

gif demonstrating a form wizard for VA Disability

Research/Accessibility rationale

  • We show questions one at a time for accessibility/universal design reasons: we try not to show irrelevant content to users.
  • We learned through research to add blue left bar to show users that the wizard questions are related and part of the same process of finding the correct form.
  • Wizard questions may come from user research, i.e. a point of confusion for many users regarding their eligibility for a VA benefit.